Torah Portion Mishpatim / Porzione di Torah Mishpatim

(L’Italiano segue sotto)

Shabbat Shalom!

Mishpatim.jpg

Welcome to Mishpatim (Laws), this week’s Parasha (Torah Portion).

This portion of Torah will be read during this week’s Shabbat (Saturday) service in synagogues all around the world. 

Because this is Shabbat Shekalim, the first of four special Shabbats before Passover, a special reading is added. 

Mishpatim (Laws)

Torah Portion: Exodus 21:1-24:18

Haftarah (Prophetic) Portion: Jeremiah 33:25-26, 34:8-22, 35:1-11 

Brit Chadashah (New Testament): Colossians 3:1-25; Matthew 5:38-42, 17:1-11 

Maftir: Exodus 30:11-16

Shabbat Shekalim: 2 Kings 12:1-17

“These are the ordinances [mishpatim הַמִּשְׁפָּטִים] that you are to set before them.” (Exodus 21:1)

In last week’s portion of Scripture, Israel received the Ten Commandments at Mount Sinai.

This week, God gives specific legislation, laws called mishpatim, which means judgments. These are intended to guide the daily lives of His holy nation in justice and righteousness.

Once We Were Slaves

“When you acquire a Jewish bondsman, for six years he shall work and in the seventh year he shall go free.” (Exodus 21:2)

Since the Israelites had just been released from slavery, the first of God’s mishpatim deals with servants and slaves.

According to the Rabbis, the six years that a slave is obligated to work represent the 6,000 years that we will work to serve the Lord.

The seventh year of freedom represents the Messianic age, the thousand years when we will rule and reign from Jerusalem with Messiah, who will sit on the Throne of His earthly father David.

Several verses later in this passage, the painful experiences of the Israelites in Egypt are highlighted again, this time to elicit empathy for the foreigner. God commands the Israelites that foreigners be treated with kindness and respect.

“You shall neither mistreat a stranger nor oppress him, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt.” (Exodus 22:21)

In total, Parasha Mishpatim contains 53 mitzvot (commands): 23 imperative commandments and 30 prohibitions.

This series of laws, also called “The Covenant Code” by some Bible scholars, specify penalties for various violent crimes, such as murder, kidnapping, and assault. Pre-meditated murder, kidnapping, and striking or even cursing a parent all carry the death penalty.

“And he who curses his father or his mother shall surely be put to death.” (Exodus 21:17)

Laws were also given regarding how to make reparation for assault and injuries caused by animals, as well as damage to crops or livestock. They prohibit seduction of virgins, the practice of sorcery, bestiality, idolatry, and mistreating the disadvantaged of society.

Infractions of these laws often carry the severest of penalties, death by stoning, since God wanted to keep peace and order within the camp.

But it is more than that. God has genuine concern for justice and the well-being of the individual. 

For instance, if a widow or fatherless child is to cry out to God because of someone’s ill treatment of them, God promises He will pour out His fierce wrath upon their oppressor and kill them so that their wives would be widows and their children fatherless (Exodus 22:22-24).

Remember the Sabbath and the Appointed Times

This week’s Parasha also reveals the law of the Sabbath, which is more than a Sabbath rest every seventh day.

Every seven years, the land is to enjoy a Sabbath rest called the Shemitah. Israel ended its last seventh year of letting the land lie fallow in September 2015.

“Six years you shall sow your land and gather in its produce, but the seventh year you shall let it rest and lie fallow, that the poor of your people may eat; and what they leave, the beasts of the field may eat.” (Exodus 23:10-11)

Shemitah.jpg

As well, the three pilgrimage festivals are mentioned as a time when all adult Jewish males are to appear before the Lord: Pesach (Passover), Shavuot (Pentecost), and Sukkot (Feast of Tabernacles).

“Three times in the year all your males shall appear before the Lord GOD.” (Exodus 23:17)

In this Parasha, Moses reads before all the people the Book of the Covenant that God has given Israel. After the people commit to keeping God’s law, Moses sprinkles blood upon the altar and on the people as well, since all covenants are formally ratified and are usually sealed with blood.

“Then he took the Book of the Covenant and read in the hearing of the people. And they said, ‘All that the LORD has said we will do, and be obedient.’ And Moses took the blood, sprinkled it on the people, and said, ‘This is the blood of the covenant which the LORD has made with you according to all these words.’” (Exodus 24:7-8)

Likewise, the New Covenant was sealed with the blood of Messiah, Yeshua, the Lamb of God. At the Passover meal with His disciples, Yeshua held up the cup of redemption and said, “This cup which is poured out for you is the new covenant in My blood.” (Luke 22:20)

The most righteous of all men, Yeshua HaMashiach, became the final atonement for all generations who accept His sacrifice on their behalf.

“I, the LORD, have called you in righteousness; I will take hold of your hand. I will keep you and will make you to be a covenant for the people and a light for the Gentiles, to open eyes that are blind, to free captives from prison and to release from the dungeon those who sit in darkness.” (Isaiah 42:6-7)

Shabbat Shekalim

shekelsshabbat.shekalim

This week begins the first of four Parashiot leading up to the festivals of Purim (March 9-March 10) and Passover (April 8-April 16). That’s right! These two holidays are just around the corner!

Because this week’s Shabbat is Shabbat Shekalim (שבת שקלים / Sabbath of Shekels), a special reading called a maftir is added. Maftir shares the same root as Haftarah — FTR, which means to conclude.

This week’s special reading concludes the Torah portion and is taken from Exodus 30:11-16, which pertains to the half-shekel tax for the Tabernacle.

Shekalim is the plural form of the Hebrew word “shekel”, which was the currency of ancient Israel. It is also used today in the modern state of Israel.

Every Jewish adult male (20 years and older) was required to give half a Biblical shekel toward the building and maintenance of the Tabernacle.

Nationally, rich and poor alike set aside personal interests and are united by contributing equally to the goal of building the Tabernacle.

In remembrance of the half shekel, at this time of year, some Jewish people contribute to institutes of Jewish learning.

Shabbat Shekalim perhaps is also a good reminder of the importance of financially contributing to the upkeep and operating costs of those who are doing the work of the Lord.

“All who cross over, those twenty years old or more, are to give an offering to the Lord. The rich are not to give more than a half shekel and the poor are not to give less when you make the offering to the Lord to atone for your lives. Receive the atonement money from the Israelites and use it for the service of the tent of meeting. It will be a memorial for the Israelites before the Lord, making atonement for your lives.” (Exodus 30:14-16)

During Temple times, the half-shekel tax, called machatzit hashekel, was due yearly on the first of Nissan.

The collection of this tax was significant and practical. Since Passover begins on Nissan 14, these extra funds allowed for the purchase of cattle for the communal sacrifices. The call for the tax was issued to the people at the start of the previous month, Adar, giving people time to prepare their payment before the annual pilgrimage to Jerusalem for Passover. Funds also contributed to the upkeep of the Temple and its vessels, the roads and pathways to the Temple, wages, and the maintenance of the ritual baths called mikvot for the customary pre-Passover purification. If a mikvah were not properly maintained, then it would not be kosher and could not be used for ritual purposes.

Shabbat Shekalim, then, is a wonderful time to renew our commitment to be faithful in our support of those places doing the work of the Lord and where we are being spiritually fed.

To listen to our Shabbat service for today, please click on the link at the bottom of the page.

To watch a video of the sermon in English and Italian, please click on the link at the bottom of the page.

Support Beit Shalom Messianic Congregation, Pozzuoli, Naples, Italy/Supporta Beit Shalom Congregazione Messianica, Pozzuoli, Napoli, Italia

Beit Shalom Messianic Congregation, Pozzuoli, Naples, Italy is a unique Messianic Congregation and Place of Worship for Jews in the Messiah Yeshua and gentiles with a heart for Israel, where they can find a shelter during time of persecution. Thanks for your donation that helps us to fulfil Hashem’s plan in the lives of His People in Israel and the diaspora. La Congregazione Messianica Beit Shalom, Pozzuoli, Napoli, Italia è una congregazione e luogo di culto Messianici unici per gli Ebrei nel Messia Yeshua e i Gentili con un cuore per Israele, dove possono trovare rifugio durante i periodi di persecuzione. Grazie per la tua donazione che ci aiuta a realizzare il piano di Hashem nella vita del Suo popolo in Israele e nella diaspora.

€100.00

Shabbat Shalom!

Benvenuto a Mishpatim (Leggi), Parasha di questa settimana (Porzione di Torah).

Questa parte della Torah sarà letta durante il Culto di Shabbat (Sabato) di questa settimana nelle sinagoghe di tutto il mondo. Perché questo è Shabbat Shekalim, il primo dei quattro Shabbat speciali prima della Pasqua Ebraica, viene aggiunta una lettura speciale.  

Mishpatim (Leggi)

Porzione di Torah: Esodo 21:1-24:18

Porzione dell’Haftarah (Profetica): Geremia 33:25-26, 34:8-22, 35:1-11 

Brit Chadashah (Nuovo Patto/Nuovo Testamento): Colossesi 3:1-25; Matteo 5:38-42, 17:1-11 

Maftir: Esodo 30:11-16

Shabbat Shekalim: 2 Re 12:1-17

“Ora queste sono le leggi [mishpatim הַמִּשְׁפָּטִים] che tu porrai davanti a loro.” (Esodo 21:1)

Nella porzione della Scrittura della settimana scorsa, Israele ha ricevuto i Dieci Comandamenti sul monte Sinai. Questa settimana, Adonai dà una legislazione specifica, le leggi chiamate mishpatimgiudizi. Questi hanno lo scopo di guidare la vita quotidiana della Sua Santa nazione Israele nella giustizia. 

Una Volta Eravamo Schiavi

“Se compri uno schiavo Ebreo, egli ti servirà per sei anni; ma il settimo se ne andrà libero, senza pagare nulla.” (Esodo 21:2)

Poiché gli Israeliti erano appena stati liberati dalla schiavitù, il primo dei mishpatim di Elohim trattava dei servi e degli schiavi. Secondo i rabbini, i sei anni in cui uno schiavo è obbligato a lavorare rappresentano i 6.000 anni in cui lavoreremo per servire il Signore. Il settimo anno di libertà rappresenta l’era Messianica, i mille anni in cui Yeshua governerà e regnerà da Gerusalemme e in cui noi saremo con Lui, Egli siederà sul Trono del Suo padre terreno, Davide. Diversi versi più avanti in questo passaggio, le esperienze dolorose degli Israeliti in Egitto sono evidenziate di nuovo, questa volta suscitano empatia per lo straniero. Elohim comanda agli Israeliti che gli stranieri siano trattati con gentilezza e rispetto.

“Non maltratterai lo straniero e non l’opprimerai perché anche voi foste stranieri nel paese d’Egitto.” (Esodo 22:21)

In totale, Parasha Mishpatim contiene 53 mitzvot (comandi): 23 comandamenti imperativi e 30 divieti.

Questa serie di leggi, chiamate anche “Il codice dell’Alleanza” da alcuni studiosi della Bibbia, specificano le pene per vari crimini violenti, come la morte, il rapimento e l’assalto. L’Omicidio premeditato, il rapimento e il colpire o persino maledire un genitore portano tutti alla pena di morte.

“Chi maledice suo padre o sua madre sarà messo a morte.” (Esodo 21:17)

Sono state inoltre emanate leggi su come riparare in caso di una aggressione e ferite causate da animali, nonché di danni alle colture o al bestiame. Si proibiscono la seduzione delle vergini, la pratica della stregoneria, la bestialità, l’idolatria e il maltrattamento degli svantaggiati della società.

Le infrazioni di queste leggi spesso comportano la più severa delle pene, la morte per lapidazione, dal momento che Elohim voleva mantenere la pace e l’ordine all’interno del campo. Ma è più di questo. Elohim ha una sincera preoccupazione per la giustizia e per il benessere dell’individuo. Per esempio, se una vedova o un bambino senza padre deve gridare ad Elohim a causa del maltrattamento di qualcuno su di loro, Elohim promette che riverserà la Sua feroce ira contro il loro oppressore e li ucciderà in modo che le loro mogli siano vedove e i loro figli senza padre (Esodo 22:22-24).

Ricorda lo Shabbat e i Tempi Designati

La Parasha di questa settimana rivela anche la legge del Sabato, che è più di un riposo Sabbatico ogni settimo giorno della settimana. Ogni sette anni, la terra deve godersi un riposo sabbatico chiamato Shemitah. Israele ha concluso il suo ultimo settimo anno lasciando che la terra rimanesse a maggese nel Settembre 2015.

“Per sei anni seminerai la tua terra e ne raccoglierai i frutti; ma il settimo anno la lascerai riposare e rimarrà incolta, affinché ne godano i poveri del tuo popolo; e le bestie della campagna mangeranno quel che essi lasceranno. Lo stesso farai della tua vigna e dei tuoi ulivi.” (Esodo 23:10-11)

Inoltre, le tre feste di pellegrinaggio sono menzionate come un’epoca in cui tutti i maschi Ebrei adulti devono comparire davanti al Signore: Pesach (Pasqua), Shavuot (Pentecoste) e Sukkot (Festa dei Tabernacoli).

“Tre volte all’anno tutti i tuoi maschi compariranno davanti al Signore, l’Eterno.” (Esodo 23:17)

In questa Parasha, Mosè legge a tutte le persone il Libro dell’Alleanza che Elohim ha dato a Israele. Dopo che il popolo di Israele si è impegnato ad osservare la legge di Elohim, Mosè spruzza il sangue sull’altare e sul popolo di Israele, da allora tutte le alleanze sono formalmente ratificate e di solito sono sigillate con il sangue.

“poi prese il libro del patto e lo lesse al popolo il quale disse: ‘Noi faremo tutto ciò che l’Eterno ha detto, e ubbidiremo’. Mosè prese quindi il sangue, ne asperse il popolo e disse: ‘Ecco il sangue del patto che l’Eterno ha fatto con voi secondo tutte queste parole’”. (Esodo 24:7-8)

Allo stesso modo, la Nuova Alleanza fu suggellata con il sangue di Yeshua, il Messia, l’Agnello di Adonai. Alla cena di Pesach con i suoi discepoli, Yeshua sostenne il calice della redenzione e disse: “Così pure, dopo aver cenato, prese il calice dicendo: ‘Questo calice è il nuovo patto nel mio sangue, che è sparso per voi.” (Luca 22:20)

Il più giusto di tutti gli uomini, Yeshua HaMashiach, è diventato l’espiazione finale per tutte le generazioni che accettano il Suo sacrificio per loro conto.

“’Io, l’Eterno, ti ho chiamato secondo giustizia e ti prenderò per mano, ti custodirò e ti farò l’alleanza del popolo e la luce delle nazioni, per aprire gli occhi dei ciechi, per fare uscire dal carcere i prigionieri e dalla prigione quelli che giacciono nelle tenebre.” (Isaia 42:6-7)

Shabbat Shekalim

Questa settimana inizia il primo di quattro Parashiot che portano al Festival di Purim (Marzo 9-Marzo 10) e alla Pasqua Ebraica o Pesach (Aprile 8-Aprile 16). Giusto! Queste due vacanze sono proprio dietro l’angolo!

Poiché lo Shabbat di questa settimana è Shabbat Shekalim (שבת שקלים / Sabato dello Shekel), viene aggiunta una nota speciale chiamata maftir. Maftir condivide la stessa radice di Haftarah – FTR, che significa concludere. Una lettura speciale di questa settimana conclude la porzione di Torah ed è presa da Esodo 30:11-16, e riguarda la mezza tassa per il Tabernacolo.

Shekalim è la forma plurale della parola Ebraica “shekel”, che era la valuta dell’antico Israele. Lo shekel è anche usato oggi nel moderno stato di Israele. Ogni maschio adulto Ebreo (20 anni e più) era tenuto a dare mezzo shekel biblico verso la costruzione e il mantenimento del Tabernacolo. A livello nazionale, sia i ricchi che i poveri mettono da parte gli interessi personali e sono uniti contribuendo allo stesso modo all’obiettivo di costruire il Tabernacolo. In ricordo del mezzo shekel, in questo periodo dell’anno, alcuni Ebrei contribuiscono agli istituti di apprendimento Ebraico. Shabbat Shekalim forse è anche un buon promemoria dell’importanza di contribuire finanziariamente alla manutenzione e ai costi operativi di coloro che stanno facendo il lavoro del Signore.

“Ognuno che sarà compreso nel censimento, dai venti anni in su, darà questa offerta all’Eterno. Il ricco non darà di più, né il povero darà meno di mezzo siclo, quando si farà quest’offerta all’Eterno per fare l’espiazione per le vostre vite. Prenderai dunque dai figli d’Israele questo denaro del riscatto e lo adopererai per il servizio della tenda di convegno: sarà per i figli d’Israele un ricordo davanti all’Eterno per fare l’espiazione per le vostre vite.’” (Esodo 30:14-16)

Durante i tempi del tempio, la tassa di mezzo shekel, chiamata machatzit hashekel, era dovuta annualmente al primo di Nissan. La riscossione di questa tassa era significativa e pratica. Poiché la Pasqua ha inizio su Nissan 14, questi fondi extra consentivano l’acquisto di bestiame per i sacrifici comunali. La chiamata per l’imposta è stata emessa alle persone all’inizio del mese precedente, Adar, così da dare alle persone il tempo di preparare il loro pagamento prima del pellegrinaggio annuale a Gerusalemme per la Pasqua (Pesach). I fondi hanno anche contribuito alla manutenzione del Tempio e i suoi vasi, delle strade e dei sentieri del Tempio, dei salari e del mantenimento del bagni rituali chiamati mikvot per la purificazione personalizzata prima del Pesach. Se una mikvah non fosse stata mantenuta correttamente, allora essa non sarebbe stata ritenuta kosher e non potrebbe essere usata per scopi rituali.

 Shabbat Shekalim, quindi, è un momento meraviglioso per rinnovare il nostro impegno ad essere fedeli nel nostro sostegno a quei luoghi che servono a farsi che il lavoro del Signore sia svolto e in cui ci nutriamo spiritualmente.

To listen to our Shabbat service for today, please click on the link below. Per ascoltare il sermone di oggi, per favore cliccate sul link sottostante:

To watch a video of the sermon in English and Italian, please click on the link below. Per vedere un video del sermone in Inglese e in Italiano, clicca sul link sottostante:

Support Beit Shalom Messianic Congregation, Pozzuoli, Naples, Italy/Supporta Beit Shalom Congregazione Messianica, Pozzuoli, Napoli, Italia

Beit Shalom Messianic Congregation, Pozzuoli, Naples, Italy is a unique Messianic Congregation and Place of Worship for Jews in the Messiah Yeshua and gentiles with a heart for Israel, where they can find a shelter during time of persecution. Thanks for your donation that helps us to fulfil Hashem’s plan in the lives of His People in Israel and the diaspora. La Congregazione Messianica Beit Shalom, Pozzuoli, Napoli, Italia è una congregazione e luogo di culto Messianici unici per gli Ebrei nel Messia Yeshua e i Gentili con un cuore per Israele, dove possono trovare rifugio durante i periodi di persecuzione. Grazie per la tua donazione che ci aiuta a realizzare il piano di Hashem nella vita del Suo popolo in Israele e nella diaspora.

€100.00

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s